Statistical Visualization

1 posts
Gallery of uncertainty visualization methods

It must be uncertainty month and nobody told me. For Scientific American, Jessica Hullman briefly describes her research in uncertainty visualization with a gallery of options from worst to best. Tags: Jessica Hullman, Scientific American, uncertainty

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A quiz to see if you’re rich

In a compare-your-preconceptions-against-reality quiz, The Upshot asks, “Are you rich?” Enter your nearest metro area, income, and what you consider to be rich. See where you actually land. Tags: income, quiz, rich, Upshot

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Exploration of players’ shot improvement in the NBA

Wondering whether if a player’s shot improves over the course of his career, Peter Beshai shows shot performance for all players from the 2018-19 season: To understand whether or not a player actually gets better over time, we need some kind of baseline to compare their current performance against. On Shotline, the baseline is set after a player completes their first season in the NBA and has shot at least...

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Wikipedia views and every line of Billy Joel’s “We Didn’t Start the Fire”

In the biggest crossover event of the century, Tom Lum used the Wikipedia API to chart the number of views for every reference in Billy Joel’s We Didn’t Start the Fire. Yes. [via @waxpancake] Tags: Billy Joel, humor, Wikipedia

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Readability of privacy policies for big tech companies

For The New York Times, Kevin Litman-Navarro plotted the length and readability of privacy policies for large companies: To see exactly how inscrutable they have become, I analyzed the length and readability of privacy policies from nearly 150 popular websites and apps. Facebook’s privacy policy, for example, takes around 18 minutes to read in its entirety – slightly above average for the policies I tested. The comparison is between websites...

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Increasing ocean temperatures, decreasing ice

For National Geographic, Kennedy Elliot made a series of heatmaps that show the relative shifts in the ocean: The oceans don’t just soak up excess heat from the atmosphere; they also absorb excess carbon dioxide, which is changing the chemistry of seawater, making it more acidic. “Ocean acidification is one simple and inescapable consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 that is both predictable and impossible to attribute to any other cause,”...

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Getting to zero coal in Britain

For The Guardian, Niko Kommenda shows the decrease in coal usage for power since 2012. As of this writing, it’s been just under 11 straight days with 0% of power generated by burning coal. The data comes from Gridwatch, which in turn scrapes reports using the Balancing Mechanism Reporting Service from Elexon. Is there a US equivalent? Tags: coal, energy, Guardian

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Game of Thrones viewer ratings by season

The last episode is coming. Some people don’t like how it’s ending, and the IMDB ratings seem to reflect this. For The Upshot, Josh Katz and K.K. Rebecca Lai charted the changes over the seasons. Reminds of me of the (now defunct) Graph TV a while back. Tags: Game of Thrones, imdb, ratings, Upshot

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Pitch speed distribution, a decrease with age

Pitch speed starts to decrease with a baseball player’s age at some point. This makes sense. That’s why athletes retire. The Statcast pitch distributions show when this happens for individual players, categorized by pitch type. I like the transparent distributions for past seasons as a mode of comparison. [via @statpumpkin] Tags: age, baseball, speed

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Remixing the grocery receipt with data visualization

In prototyping mode, Susie Lu incorporated visualization into the common receipt from the grocery store. It gives a price breakdown for money spent on an actual receipt-sized paper using the same thermal printer you might see at the store. It reminds me of the redesigned nutrition facts on a milk carton. Whatever happened to that trend of sticking visualization on everyday things? I think it’s comeback time. Tags: receipt, remake

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