Statistical Visualization

3 posts
Twitter bot purge

With Twitter cracking down, some users are experiencing bigger dips in follower count than others. Jeremy Ashkenas charted some of the drops. Tags: fake, Twitter

0 0
Street network orientation in major cities

Using OpenStreetMap data, Geoff Boeing charted the orientation distributions of major cities: Each of the cities above is represented by a polar histogram (aka rose diagram) depicting how its streets orient. Each bar’s direction represents the compass bearings of the streets (in that histogram bin) and its length represents the relative frequency of streets with those bearings. So you can easily spot the gridded street networks, and then there’s Boston...

0 0
Visual introduction to bias in machine learning

A few years ago, Stephanie Yee and Tony Chu explained the introductory facets of machine learning. The piece stood out because it was such a good use of the scrollytelling format. Yee and Chu just published a follow-up that goes into more detail about bias, intentional or not. It’s equally worth your time. (Seems to work best in Chrome.) Tags: machine learning, scrollytelling

0 0
Math gender gap bigger in richer school districts

This is quite the scatterplot from Claire Cain Miller and Kevin Quealy for The Upshot. The vertical axis represents by how much girls or boys are better in standardized tests; the horizontal axis represents wealth; each bubble represents a school district; and yellow represents English test scores, and blue represents math test scores. The result: a non-trend up top and a widening gap at the bottom. Tags: gender, math, school,...

0 0
A visualization game to understand education and school segregation

Educate Your Child by Gabrielle LaMarr LeMee uses census data and the school selection process to simulate the steps you you might take in choosing your kid’s first school in Chicago. The Chicago public school system has a high level of school segregation as a result of parent’ residential and school choices as well as policy decisions that do not encourage integrated neighborhoods and schools. In this game, you are...

0 0
Income mobility for different groups

Building on their previous visualization work on black boys dropping income levels in adulthood, The Upshot adds the option to change demographic groups. See income mobility for different races, genders, and income starting points. Tags: demographics, income, Upshot

0 0
Black boys dropping income levels as adults

Research by Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Maggie Jones, and Sonya Porter from the Equality of Opportunity Project suggests that black boys who grow up in rich families are still much more likely to fall into lower income levels than white boys who grow up in equally rich families. The shift from low income to higher levels also appears to be a greater challenge, which makes closing the gap that much...

0 0
One-way tickets out for homeless people

Many cities provide free bus tickets for homeless people who want to relocate. The Guardian compiled data from sixteen cities to show where thousands of people bussed to over a six-year period. The data from these cities has been compiled to build the first comprehensive picture of America’s homeless relocation programs. Over the past six years, the period for which our data is most complete, we are able to track...

0 0
Beginner’s guide to visualization literacy

Mikhail Popov, a data scientist at the Wikimedia Foundation, led a workshop on visualization literacy recently. A short guide from that workshop is now freely available online. Tags: learning

0 0
Who’s winning the medal race, depending on how you weight the medals

Every year, we look at the medal counts of each country. Who’s winning? It depends on how much value you place on each medal. Do you only count the golds and disregard silver and bronze? Do you just treat all medals the same? Josh Katz for The Upshot lets you test all the possibilities with this interactive. Apply different values to each medal type by mousing over the x-y coordinate...

0 0