Statistical Visualization

2 posts
How people laugh online

Laughter online is full of nuances. A capitalization of some letters or a single space can change the meaning completely. Good thing The Pudding is examining the subject. Tags: laughing, Pudding

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Animated line chart to show the rich paying less taxes

David Leonhardt, for The New York Times, discusses the relatively low tax rates for the country’s 400 wealthiest households. The accompanying animated line chart by Stuart A. Thompson shows how the rates have been dropping over the years, which are now “below the rates for almost everyone else.” Oh. Tags: New York Times, rich, Stuart A. Thompson, taxes

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The early beginnings of visual thinking

Visualization is a relatively new field. Sort of. The increased availability of data has pushed visualization forward in more recent years, but its roots go back centuries. Michael Friendly and Howard Wainer rewind back to the second half of the 1800s, looking at the rise of visual thinking. On the first construction of the periodic table of elements: On February 17, 1869, right after breakfast, and with a train to...

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Analysis of street network orientation in cities

Continuing his analysis of street grid-iness in cities around the world, Geoff Boeing sorted cities by the amount of order in their street networks: Across these study sites, US/Canadian cities have an average orientation-order nearly thirteen-times greater than that of European cities, alongside nearly double the average proportion of four-way intersections. Meanwhile, these European cities’ streets on average are 42% more circuitous than those of the US/Canadian cities. North American...

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How well players drafted in fantasy football

For The Upshot, Kevin Quealy used a heatmap to visualize fantasy football draft picks: This variance is widest for quarterbacks, whose pick patterns are so distinct you don’t even need to read their names to know they’re a quarterback. Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes, named the N.F.L.’s most valuable player last season, represents the most obvious example of this pattern, with a roughly equal likelihood of being drafted in any of...

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Gallery of uncertainty visualization methods

It must be uncertainty month and nobody told me. For Scientific American, Jessica Hullman briefly describes her research in uncertainty visualization with a gallery of options from worst to best. Tags: Jessica Hullman, Scientific American, uncertainty

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A quiz to see if you’re rich

In a compare-your-preconceptions-against-reality quiz, The Upshot asks, “Are you rich?” Enter your nearest metro area, income, and what you consider to be rich. See where you actually land. Tags: income, quiz, rich, Upshot

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Exploration of players’ shot improvement in the NBA

Wondering whether if a player’s shot improves over the course of his career, Peter Beshai shows shot performance for all players from the 2018-19 season: To understand whether or not a player actually gets better over time, we need some kind of baseline to compare their current performance against. On Shotline, the baseline is set after a player completes their first season in the NBA and has shot at least...

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Wikipedia views and every line of Billy Joel’s “We Didn’t Start the Fire”

In the biggest crossover event of the century, Tom Lum used the Wikipedia API to chart the number of views for every reference in Billy Joel’s We Didn’t Start the Fire. Yes. [via @waxpancake] Tags: Billy Joel, humor, Wikipedia

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Readability of privacy policies for big tech companies

For The New York Times, Kevin Litman-Navarro plotted the length and readability of privacy policies for large companies: To see exactly how inscrutable they have become, I analyzed the length and readability of privacy policies from nearly 150 popular websites and apps. Facebook’s privacy policy, for example, takes around 18 minutes to read in its entirety – slightly above average for the policies I tested. The comparison is between websites...

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