Statistical Visualization

83 posts
Increase in cases since states reopened

Using the now all too familiar baseline chart, where all of the time series line up relative to to starting point, The New York Times shows how case rates have faired since states reopened. Up, up, and away. Tags: coronavirus, New York Times

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Cases vs. testing

There have been assertions that increased case counts are all from increased testing. As you might expect, it’s not so clear cut. Andrew Witherspoon and Caitlin Owens for Axios show the changes in testing against changes in cases. So in the wideout view of every state, the more-testing-more-cases assertion isn’t so straightforward. ProPublica provided a similar comparison a couple of weeks ago, but I like the difference charts here for...

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Gaps between black and white America

New York Times Opinion compared several demographics, such as unemployment and income, between majority-black and majority-white neighborhoods in the United States. They come back to the zipper chart technique where the dots start together and then separate to emphasize the gaps. Horizontally, dots are sorted by smallest to largest difference. Tags: demographics, New York Times, race

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Karen equivalents, based on name data

The name Karen. It’s not a common baby name these days. It peaked in the 1960s. The Pudding looked for other names in US history that followed similar trends: To put this question to the test, we checked baby names from the last 100 years and eliminated those that: 1) never made it into the Top 20 most popular names in any year and 2) were not present in the...

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2020 election forecast

The Economist launched their 2020 elections forecast. Right now a part of my brain is telling me to avoid election forecasts this year, but the other part of me is like, don’t fight it, you know you’re going to look. At least The Economist put their modeling code up on GitHub (implemented in R and Stan) and is publishing their polling data (linked at the bottom of the forecast page...

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Health conditions and income

A large proportion of those who died from Covid-19 had pre-existing medical conditions. The percentage of those who have pre-existing medical conditions changes a lot by income group. Based on estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we can see by how much. For New York Times Opinion, Yaryna Serkez charted the difference for the largest cities in the United States. Tags: coronavirus, health, income, New York Times,...

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Visualizing black America in 1900

The visualization work of W.E.B. Du Bois and his students has been on FD before, but it’s worth another look. In 1900, they put together a series of charts for a Paris exhibition visualizing black America. You can access the collection via the Library of Congress. If you’re looking for more context for the charts and the times, Whitney Battle-Baptiste and Britt Rusert wrote about the history and motivations in...

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Where unemployment benefits are higher than lost wages

Economists at the University of Chicago analyzed unemployment benefits from the CARES act and compared them against median salaries for different occupations and by state. FiveThirtyEight highlighted the differences: The researchers uncovered other kinds of inequality, too. In some professions, like janitorial work, people who are employed by essential businesses are continuing to show up to their jobs under hazardous conditions. But in doing so, they may be eligible for...

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LEGO normal distribution animation

Let’s just animate all statistical concepts with LEGO from now on: My daughter loved the @FryRsquared Christmas Lectures so much she made this Lego Statistics Animation https://t.co/Q3X2FUYS2m pic.twitter.com/caavfR8ESD — Caroline Lear (@CarolineLear) May 15, 2020 Tags: distribution, LEGO

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How experts use disease modeling to help inform policymakers

Harry Stevens and John Muyskens for The Washington Post put you in the spot of an epidemiologist receiving inquiries from policymakers about what might happen: Imagine you are an epidemiologist, and one day the governor sends you an email about an emerging new disease that has just arrived in your state. To avoid the complexities of a real disease like covid-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus, we have...

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