Statistical Visualization

12 posts
A collection of Charles-Joseph Minard’s statistical graphics

Charles-Joseph Minard, best known for a graphic he made (during retirement, one year before his death) showing Napoleon’s March, made many statistical graphics over his career. The Minard System from Sandra Rendgen is a collection of these works. The first section is background on Minard, his famed graphic, and his process, but really, you get it for the collection of vintage graphic goodness. [Amazon link] Tags: book, Charles-Joseph Minard

0 0
Millions of data points with deep scatterplots

Ben Schmidt uses deep scatterplots to visualize millions of data points. It’s a combination of algorithm-based display and hiding of points as you zoom in and out like you might an interactive map. Schmidt describes the process and made the code available on GitHub. Tags: algorithm

0 0
Measuring the varied sentiments of good and bad words

There was a survey a while back that asked people to provide a 0 to 100 percent value to probabilistic words like “usually” and “likely”. YouGov did something similar for words describing good and bad sentiments. Tags: sentiment, words

0 0
Inside Hurricane Maria, a 3-D perspective

This 3-D view inside Hurricane Maria, from NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, lets you see the data and the lead-up to the storm in a neat 360-degree view. Be sure to watch it on your phone or with a VR thingy for full effect. Disregard the questionable color scale. Tags: 3-d, hurricane, NASA, VR

0 0
Constructing charts and graphs

Jeffrey Heer, a computer science professor at the University of Washington, provides an overview of building charts for analysis and exploration. It’s an iterative process between acquisition, cleaning, integration, visualization, modeling, presentation, and dissemination. [via @albertocairo] Tags: components, Jeffrey Heer, lunch talk

0 0
Experience a soccer game through crowd noise

Sports visualization and analysis tends to focus on gameplay — where the players are, where the ball goes, etc. In Reimagine the Game, the focus in on crowd noise through the course of a game. Pick a game and see the waves of noise oscillate through the arena during significant events. It’s an advertisement feature on The Economist, which is kind of interesting, but it’s still fun to watch the...

0 0
More wildfires than ever

Peter Aldhous for BuzzFeed News delves into the increasing number of wildfires in California: Most of California’s rain and snow falls in between October and March, which means that fire season peaks in the summer, as vegetation dies and dries out. In Southern California, the season extends into the fall, when Santa Ana winds, which blow from the dry interior toward the coast, whip up small fires into major conflagrations....

0 0
Why the city is hotter than the suburb

NPR used video from a thermographic camera to explain why cities tend to be hotter than their surrounding areas. Straightforward and a good complement to the video. Tags: city, heat, NPR

0 0
Twitter bot purge

With Twitter cracking down, some users are experiencing bigger dips in follower count than others. Jeremy Ashkenas charted some of the drops. Tags: fake, Twitter

0 0
Street network orientation in major cities

Using OpenStreetMap data, Geoff Boeing charted the orientation distributions of major cities: Each of the cities above is represented by a polar histogram (aka rose diagram) depicting how its streets orient. Each bar’s direction represents the compass bearings of the streets (in that histogram bin) and its length represents the relative frequency of streets with those bearings. So you can easily spot the gridded street networks, and then there’s Boston...

0 0