temperature

4 posts
Hotter days where you were born

It’s getting hotter around the world. The New York Times zooms in on your hometown to show the average number of “very hot days” (at least 90 degrees) since you were born and then the projected count over the next decades. Then you zoom out to see how that relates to the rest of the world. I’ve always found it interesting that visualization and analysis are typically “overview first, then...

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3-D tube chart of global CO2 concentration and temperature

Because you can never have enough time series charts that show increases of CO2 and temperature over decades. By Kevin Pluck: Differing from the variations we’ve seen before, time is on the circle, and the metrics are on the vertical. Then it rotates for dramatic effect. See also the the two-dimensional Cartesian version from Bloomberg and the polar coordinate version by Ed Hawkins. There are also plenty more temperature charts....

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Temperature simulation near the Earth’s core

Researchers are building models to simulate the Earth’s core. From CNRS News: Take a journey to the center of the Earth—as far as its outer core, at least—and you’ll find a swirling mass of metal, mainly iron, kept in liquid form by the region’s intense heat. Temperature and pressure variations across this layer cause the melted metal to rise in hotter zones and to sink in cooler ones—convection movements that...

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Oceans absorbing heat

It keeps getting hotter on this planet, and the oceans are absorbing most of the heat. Tim Wallace for the New York Times shows several decades of changes. Tags: environment, New York Times, temperature, Tim Wallace

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xkcd: Earth temperature timeline

In classic xkcd-fashion, Randall Munroe timelines the Earth’s temperature, dating back to 20,000 BCE up to present. Slow changes, slow changes, history, slow changes, still slow changes, and then, oh shoot. Tags: environment, temperature, xkcd

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Seoul’s Steamy Summer

Note: I followed my wife, a foreign correspondent for NPR News, to Seoul last year. This is one of a series of posts exploring our adopted country’s demographics, politics and other nerdy data stuff. Let me know if you have ideas for future posts. I’ve been away from Seoul for much of the summer, but now that I’m back it’s impossible not to hear all the complaining — among expats...

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Spiraling global temperature chart

Global temperature is on the rise, as most of us know. Ed Hawkins charted it in this spiral edition of temperature over time. Spiralling global temperatures from 1850-2016 (full animation) https://t.co/YETC5HkmTr pic.twitter.com/Ypci717AHq — Ed Hawkins (@ed_hawkins) May 9, 2016 See also the Quartz chart that uses a standard coordinate system but stacks lines on top of one another. Tags: temperature, time series, weather

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Someday I’ll Say Goodbye to Seoul. I Might Miss the Weather.

I’ve been in Seoul just over a year, and I can’t stay here forever, so I’m starting to think seriously about the next city. For me, a key consideration is weather (and, you know, work and kids’ schools and such). Seoul’s been pretty great, especially the relatively mild summers. But what can I expect from the next town? Here are the average monthly temperatures for the likely contenders. Some are...

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How much warmer your city was in 2015

It was hotter in 2015 than any other year ever. K. K. Rebecca Lai for the New York Times shows just how much hotter it was in your city. Simply type in your city name or click on the arrows to browse to see a time series for the year. The background bars in lighter gray show all-time highs and lows, the darker gray bars show normal range, and the...

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Feeling hot, hot, hot

When you look at overall global temperatures over time, you see a rising line and new heat records set. Instead of just one line though, Tom Randall and Blacki Migliozzi for Bloomberg split up the time series by year and animated it. Each year is overlaid on top of the other with a new time series in each frame. The dotted line rises too as new records are set, and...

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