Upshot

2 posts
Judging connectedness of American communities, based on Facebook friendships

We talk about geographic bubbles a lot these days. Some areas are isolated, in their own bubble. Other areas seem more connected. Emily Badger and Quoctrung Bui for The Upshot looked at this geographic connectedness through the lens of Facebook friendships. In the millions of ties on Facebook that connect relatives, co-workers, classmates and friends, Americans are far more likely to know people nearby than in distant communities that share...

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Live polling results for transparency and a way to learn about the process

In a collaboration with Siena College, The Upshot is showing live polling results. The ticker moves in real-time for every phone call. For the first time, we’ll publish our poll results and display them in real time, from start to finish, respondent by respondent. No media organization has ever tried something like this, and we hope to set a new standard of transparency. You’ll see the poll results at the...

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Extremely detailed election map

The Upshot returns to 2016 election results mapped at the precinct level. Because you know, we all want to experience the data as many times as we can before 2020. There’s an interesting twist though. You can randomly view “one-sided places”, where the area voted mostly the same, and “voter islands”, where the area is surrounded by opposite-voting precincts. These are made more compelling by the granular data and ease...

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Analysis: Do the shoes matter in marathon running?

Kevin Quealy and Josh Katz for The Upshot analyzed shoe and running data to see if Nike’s Vaporfly running shoes really helped marathoners achieve faster times. Accounting for a number of confounding factors, the results appear to point to yes. We found that the difference was not explained by faster runners choosing to wear the shoes, by runners choosing to wear them in easier races or by runners switching to...

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Math gender gap bigger in richer school districts

This is quite the scatterplot from Claire Cain Miller and Kevin Quealy for The Upshot. The vertical axis represents by how much girls or boys are better in standardized tests; the horizontal axis represents wealth; each bubble represents a school district; and yellow represents English test scores, and blue represents math test scores. The result: a non-trend up top and a widening gap at the bottom. Tags: gender, math, school,...

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Cities like yours

There are many ways to estimate how similar two cities are — weather, demographics, taxes, etc. Jed Kolko from job site Indeed and Josh Katz for The Upshot used the distribution of job offerings. Just enter your city or a nearby metro, and you get something like this: I punched in cities I’ve lived in or visited, and the results looked pretty good. The analysis is based on job postings...

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Income mobility for different groups

Building on their previous visualization work on black boys dropping income levels in adulthood, The Upshot adds the option to change demographic groups. See income mobility for different races, genders, and income starting points. Tags: demographics, income, Upshot

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Black boys dropping income levels as adults

Research by Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Maggie Jones, and Sonya Porter from the Equality of Opportunity Project suggests that black boys who grow up in rich families are still much more likely to fall into lower income levels than white boys who grow up in equally rich families. The shift from low income to higher levels also appears to be a greater challenge, which makes closing the gap that much...

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Needle of uncertainty

The Upshot has used a needle to show shifts in their live election forecasts, because many readers don’t understand probability. Nate Cohn and Josh Katz: This was evident before the result of the 2016 election, and as a result we tried something new: a jitter, where the needle quivered to reflect the uncertainty around the forecast. Although many readers disliked it, the jitter reflected an earnest attempt to give tangible...

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Who’s winning the medal race, depending on how you weight the medals

Every year, we look at the medal counts of each country. Who’s winning? It depends on how much value you place on each medal. Do you only count the golds and disregard silver and bronze? Do you just treat all medals the same? Josh Katz for The Upshot lets you test all the possibilities with this interactive. Apply different values to each medal type by mousing over the x-y coordinate...

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