Upshot

10 posts
Game of Thrones viewer ratings by season

The last episode is coming. Some people don’t like how it’s ending, and the IMDB ratings seem to reflect this. For The Upshot, Josh Katz and K.K. Rebecca Lai charted the changes over the seasons. Reminds of me of the (now defunct) Graph TV a while back. Tags: Game of Thrones, imdb, ratings, Upshot

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Comparing the potential cost of Medicare for everyone

For The Upshot, Josh Katz, Kevin Quealy, and Margot Sanger-Katz, consulted economists to ask what the cost of Medicare for all might look like: The proposals themselves are vague on crucial points. More broadly, any Medicare for all system would be influenced by the decisions and actions of parties concerned — patients, health care providers and political actors — in complex, hard-to-predict ways. But seeing the range of responses, and...

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Contrasting social media Democrats to real life

As many know (I hope), what we see on social media often doesn’t mirror real life. It’s a filtered and algorithmically-driven point of view. This grows problematic when people make decisions based solely on what they see through their feeds. For The Upshot, Nate Cohn and Kevin Quealy look at the contrasts between the filtered view and the real life view and how it factors into voting. Tags: elections, social...

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Language used for the wall

For The Upshot, Kevin Quealy continues on his path looking at the words used by Donald Trump. This time Quealy examines descriptions of the wall and who will pay for it, pre- and post-inauguration. Tags: Kevin Quealy, Upshot, wall

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Reduced privacy risk in exchange for accuracy in the Census count

Mark Hansen for The Upshot describes the search for balance between individual privacy and an accurate 2020 Census count. It turns out to not be that difficult to reconstruct person-level data from publicly available aggregates: On the face of it, finding a reconstruction that satisfies all of the constraints from all the tables the bureau produces seems impossible. But Mr. Abowd says the problem gets easier when you notice that...

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Judging connectedness of American communities, based on Facebook friendships

We talk about geographic bubbles a lot these days. Some areas are isolated, in their own bubble. Other areas seem more connected. Emily Badger and Quoctrung Bui for The Upshot looked at this geographic connectedness through the lens of Facebook friendships. In the millions of ties on Facebook that connect relatives, co-workers, classmates and friends, Americans are far more likely to know people nearby than in distant communities that share...

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Live polling results for transparency and a way to learn about the process

In a collaboration with Siena College, The Upshot is showing live polling results. The ticker moves in real-time for every phone call. For the first time, we’ll publish our poll results and display them in real time, from start to finish, respondent by respondent. No media organization has ever tried something like this, and we hope to set a new standard of transparency. You’ll see the poll results at the...

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Extremely detailed election map

The Upshot returns to 2016 election results mapped at the precinct level. Because you know, we all want to experience the data as many times as we can before 2020. There’s an interesting twist though. You can randomly view “one-sided places”, where the area voted mostly the same, and “voter islands”, where the area is surrounded by opposite-voting precincts. These are made more compelling by the granular data and ease...

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Analysis: Do the shoes matter in marathon running?

Kevin Quealy and Josh Katz for The Upshot analyzed shoe and running data to see if Nike’s Vaporfly running shoes really helped marathoners achieve faster times. Accounting for a number of confounding factors, the results appear to point to yes. We found that the difference was not explained by faster runners choosing to wear the shoes, by runners choosing to wear them in easier races or by runners switching to...

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Math gender gap bigger in richer school districts

This is quite the scatterplot from Claire Cain Miller and Kevin Quealy for The Upshot. The vertical axis represents by how much girls or boys are better in standardized tests; the horizontal axis represents wealth; each bubble represents a school district; and yellow represents English test scores, and blue represents math test scores. The result: a non-trend up top and a widening gap at the bottom. Tags: gender, math, school,...

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