Upshot

1 posts
Flow of prison population

In a collaboration between The Marshall Project and The Upshot, Anna Flagg and Joseph Neff look at the flow in and out of jails and what that means during these times of social distancing: Preventing the spread of the virus in jails is challenging. Social distancing is crucial, but it’s virtually impossible in dormitories with rows of beds in a common room. The same is true of two people in...

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Hospital bed occupancy

Using estimates from the Harvard Global Health Institute, The Upshot mapped what hospital bed occupancy might look like across the country if we don’t make changes now: “If we don’t make substantial changes, both in spreading the disease over time and expanding capacity, we’re going to run out of hospital beds,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, the director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, which produced the estimates. “And in that...

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Possible coronavirus deaths compared against other causes

Based on estimates from public health researcher James Lawler, The Upshot shows the range of coronavirus deaths, given variable infection and fatality rate. Adjust with the sliders and see how the death count (over a year) compares against other major causes of death: Dr. Lawler’s estimate, 480,000 deaths, is higher than the number who die in a year from dementia, emphysema, stroke or diabetes. There are only two causes of...

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Federal budget scaled to per person dollars

For The Upshot, Alicia Parlapiano and Quoctrung Bui scaled down the federal budget to something more relatable: To better understand how federal spending has changed since Mr. Trump has taken office, we looked at the actual budget amounts for the 2020 fiscal year. We divided them by the U.S. population and sized the numbers proportionally to make their scale easier to visualize. Then we compared the numbers to the actual...

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Data problems in Iowa caucus results

It wasn’t just issues with an app. There appears to be many more problems with the Iowa caucus results. The Upshot broke it down with a closer look at the data: Some of these inconsistencies may prove to be innocuous, and they do not indicate an intentional effort to compromise or rig the result. There is no apparent bias in favor of the leaders Pete Buttigieg or Bernie Sanders, meaning...

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Urban growth via satellite imagery

For The Upshot, Emily Badger and Quoctrung Bui looked for major urban developments in the United States by comparing satellite imagery of past to present: To grasp the scale of this decade of change, The Upshot worked with Tim Wallace and Krishna Karra from Descartes Labs, a geospatial analytics company, using a tool that has itself evolved significantly over this time: satellite imagery. With its growing power and precision, we...

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How well players drafted in fantasy football

For The Upshot, Kevin Quealy used a heatmap to visualize fantasy football draft picks: This variance is widest for quarterbacks, whose pick patterns are so distinct you don’t even need to read their names to know they’re a quarterback. Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes, named the N.F.L.’s most valuable player last season, represents the most obvious example of this pattern, with a roughly equal likelihood of being drafted in any of...

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A quiz to see if you’re rich

In a compare-your-preconceptions-against-reality quiz, The Upshot asks, “Are you rich?” Enter your nearest metro area, income, and what you consider to be rich. See where you actually land. Tags: income, quiz, rich, Upshot

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Game of Thrones viewer ratings by season

The last episode is coming. Some people don’t like how it’s ending, and the IMDB ratings seem to reflect this. For The Upshot, Josh Katz and K.K. Rebecca Lai charted the changes over the seasons. Reminds of me of the (now defunct) Graph TV a while back. Tags: Game of Thrones, imdb, ratings, Upshot

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Comparing the potential cost of Medicare for everyone

For The Upshot, Josh Katz, Kevin Quealy, and Margot Sanger-Katz, consulted economists to ask what the cost of Medicare for all might look like: The proposals themselves are vague on crucial points. More broadly, any Medicare for all system would be influenced by the decisions and actions of parties concerned — patients, health care providers and political actors — in complex, hard-to-predict ways. But seeing the range of responses, and...

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