Upshot

13 posts
Math gender gap bigger in richer school districts

This is quite the scatterplot from Claire Cain Miller and Kevin Quealy for The Upshot. The vertical axis represents by how much girls or boys are better in standardized tests; the horizontal axis represents wealth; each bubble represents a school district; and yellow represents English test scores, and blue represents math test scores. The result: a non-trend up top and a widening gap at the bottom. Tags: gender, math, school,...

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Cities like yours

There are many ways to estimate how similar two cities are — weather, demographics, taxes, etc. Jed Kolko from job site Indeed and Josh Katz for The Upshot used the distribution of job offerings. Just enter your city or a nearby metro, and you get something like this: I punched in cities I’ve lived in or visited, and the results looked pretty good. The analysis is based on job postings...

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Income mobility for different groups

Building on their previous visualization work on black boys dropping income levels in adulthood, The Upshot adds the option to change demographic groups. See income mobility for different races, genders, and income starting points. Tags: demographics, income, Upshot

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Black boys dropping income levels as adults

Research by Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Maggie Jones, and Sonya Porter from the Equality of Opportunity Project suggests that black boys who grow up in rich families are still much more likely to fall into lower income levels than white boys who grow up in equally rich families. The shift from low income to higher levels also appears to be a greater challenge, which makes closing the gap that much...

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Needle of uncertainty

The Upshot has used a needle to show shifts in their live election forecasts, because many readers don’t understand probability. Nate Cohn and Josh Katz: This was evident before the result of the 2016 election, and as a result we tried something new: a jitter, where the needle quivered to reflect the uncertainty around the forecast. Although many readers disliked it, the jitter reflected an earnest attempt to give tangible...

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Who’s winning the medal race, depending on how you weight the medals

Every year, we look at the medal counts of each country. Who’s winning? It depends on how much value you place on each medal. Do you only count the golds and disregard silver and bronze? Do you just treat all medals the same? Josh Katz for The Upshot lets you test all the possibilities with this interactive. Apply different values to each medal type by mousing over the x-y coordinate...

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Where athletes in professional sports come from

Sports are growing more international with respect to the athletes. Gregor Aisch, Kevin Quealy, and Rory Smith for The Upshot show by how much, with a focus on leagues in Europe and North America. I like how: The dominant home country in each chart doubles as background and a layer; the tooltip shades the country you moused over while still showing the other countries; and the missing data and gaps...

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Most popular GIFs used to express emotion in different countries

People often use animated GIFs to digitally express caricatures of emotion or reaction. So when you look at the most distinct ones of various countries associated with specific emotions, you get sort of a caricature for each region. Amanda Hess and Quoctrung Bui for The Upshot looked. I wonder what the GIFs look like for people who are less likely to display emotion. Does the straight face cross over to...

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How your taxes will change

I’m pretty sure this is all that most people want to know. The Upshot provides a tax calculator that considers the Republican tax bill and the variation of taxes between households that earn similar incomes. Punch in some information like income range and marital status, and you get a range of tax cuts or increases for households similar to yours. Tags: taxes, Upshot

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Where students learn the most

Emily Badger and Kevin Quealy, reporting for the Upshot, highlights research from Sean Reardon, a professor of poverty and inequality in education. Reardon’s research suggests that the relationships between income and standardized test scores should be reevaluated. This new data shows that many do overcome them. It also suggests that states that rate schools and select which ones to reward or shutter based on average test scores are using the...

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