Vox

493 posts
Examination of songs after virality on TikTok

Vox, in collaboration with The Pudding, looked at what happens when a song goes viral on TikTok. It heads down the TikTok-to-Spotify pipeline, which signals money to be made and draws labels to take advantage. Tags: music, Pudding, TikTok, viral, Vox

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Inflation explained with eggs

The prices of everything seem to be rising a lot lately. Why? For Vox, Emily Stewart uses eggs as a case study to explain: “There are different ways of thinking about the inflation issue, and economists by default tend to think about macroeconomic issues such as inflation in macroeconomic terms,” said Isabella Weber, an economist at UMass Amherst. “In this current situation that we are facing, we basically have very...

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Stat-driven view on how American conservatives shifted against vaccine

As we know by now, conservatives in the U.S. are more commonly against getting vaccinated for Covid, but it wasn’t always like that. Vox shows how ideas shifted to get to where we are now. The 1990s elementary school aesthetic with markers and overhead projector slides works well here. The choices guide you step-by-step through the data points. Tags: coronavirus, politics, vaccination, Vox

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How the 3-point line changed basketball

Vox shows how the 3-point line is “breaking” the game. The basic math says a 3-point shot is more efficient for scoring points than a 2-point shot if the team can make a high enough percentage of attempts. It’s why the mid-range shot has fallen out of favor. But it’s more an evolution than a breaking. Defense adapts, and then offense adjusts to that, etc. Stephen Curry making double-digit threes...

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Vaccine efficacy rates explained

Vox explains efficacy rates and why the best vaccine is the one you get now: Tags: coronavirus, vaccine, Vox

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How washing your hands for 20 seconds does the trick

Vox used a lotion that mimics viruses to demonstrate the power of washing your hands for twenty seconds: Tags: coronavirus, handwash, Vox

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How online school ratings are flawed

Standardized ratings are a challenge, because they often try to encapsulate many variables into a single variable. On the upside, a single score is quick and easy to see, but on the downside, variance goes into hiding and people/things that don’t fit a defined standard get dinged. Vox looks at these challenges in the context of online school ratings. Tags: ratings, school, Vox

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Measuring pop music’s falsetto usage

Vox and Matt Daniels delved into falsetto in pop music over the years. Is falsetto a big trend now compared to the rest of the history? The process of finding the answer, noisy data and all, was just as interesting as the answer itself. Tags: falsetto, Matt Daniels, music, Vox

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Why some Asian accents swap Ls and Rs

Vox delves into why Ls and Rs often get replaced by Asian speakers using English as a second language. Some sounds aren’t prevalent in other languages, and it’s not the same across all Asian languages. Tags: Asian, language, Vox

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Segregation compared during work and at home

Based on commuting data from the Census Bureau, researchers Matthew Hall, John Iceland, and Youngmin Yi tracked segregation during the day and night. Alvin Chang for Vox mapped their results: They found that when white people go to work, they are around only slightly more people of color than when they’re in their home neighborhoods. But for everyone else, going to work means being exposed to many more white people...

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