Washington Post

1 posts
Unsolved killings mapped

Thousands of homicides. Some cases result in an arrest. Many end up unsolved. The Washington Post mapped areas in major cities to show the contrast between the two types of homicide cases. The data looks noisy at first, but when you compare cities like Baltimore with low arrest rates against cities like Atlanta with high arrest rates, you start to wonder. Tags: arrests, homicide, law, Washington Post

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What’s in a food truck

Food trucks are the real deal these days. The best ones serve a specialized menu really well, in a small, focused space. The Washington Post delves into the insides of several of these trucks and how they make the food with very specific equipment. Tags: food truck, illustration, Washington Post

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Mapping a diverse but segregated America

Aaron Williams and Armand Emamdjomeh for The Washington Post delve into diversity and segregation in the United States. The boiling pot continues to get more ingredients, but they’re not mixing evenly. Some 50 years ago, policies like the Fair Housing Act and Voting Rights Act were enacted to increase integration, promote equity, combat discrimination and dismantle the lingering legacy of Jim Crow laws. But a Post analysis shows that some...

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Get all caught up with The Avengers using this timeline

It’s been a decade since the first Iron Man movie, and some 30 superhero characters later, we arrive at a two-parter Avengers finale. But maybe you lost track of everything that happened leading up to this point. Sonia Rao and Shelly Tan for the Washington Post got you covered with a filterable timeline. Focus on specific stories, characters, and franchises. Select “block spoilers” in case you still plan to watch...

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A gem among the snowpack of Olympics data journalism

It's not often I come across a piece of data journalism that pleases me so much. Here it is, the "Happy 700" article by Washington Post is amazing.   When data journalism and dataviz are done right, the designers have made good decisions. Here are some of the key elements that make this article work: (1) Unique The topic is timely but timeliness heightens both the demand and supply of...

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Scale comparison of wildfires

The past few days in California has been non-stop rain, but the months before that, there was unprecedented wildfires in the state. Lauren Tierney, reporting for The Washington Post, provides an overview along with a scale comparison of 2017’s biggest fire against anywhere on the globe. Tags: California, fires, scale, Washington Post

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Tax calculator that considers where you live

Here’s a different look at tax cuts and increases from Reuben Fischer-Baum for The Washington Post. As Fischer-Baum points out, keep in mind that these are just estimates and they calculations vary: Analyses that use data from real taxpayers as their starting point – like the calculator put together by the New York Times – produce lower estimates. Other calculators like the one put together by the Wall Street Journal...

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Alabama voter demographics

Democrat Doug Jones won in the senate race against Republican Roy More last night. The Washington Post provides how different demographic groups voted, based on a poll “conducted by Edison Research for the National Election Pool, The Washington Post and other media organizations.” Tags: demographics, election, Washington Post

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Stopping a nuclear missile fired at the US

I hate that this feels like something civilians should know. Bonnie Berkowitz and Aaron Steckelberg, reporting for the Washington Post, describe with a graphic how the United States might counter a nuclear missile fired by North Korea. Tags: missile, scrollytelling, Washington Post

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Generations of tech, as seen through video source, music players, and internet access

In a fun piece by Reuben Fischer-Baum, reporting for The Washington Post: In the past three decades, the United States has seen staggering technological changes. In 1984, just 8 percent of households had a personal computer, the World Wide Web was still five years away, and cell phones were enormous. Americans born that year are only 33 years old. Here’s how some key parts of our technological lives have shifted,...

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