Washington Post

109 posts
Election night might take weeks

For The Washington Post, Ashlyn Still and Kevin Schaul charted how long it took for primary ballots to be counted in each state. The times might give a hint of what we’re in for on election night: Before the pandemic struck, mail-in states like California were already counting slowly. Then the coronavirus forced dozens of states to quickly expand absentee voting, and the slowdowns got more dramatic. These two trends...

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Voting guide for your state

The Washington Post provides another straightforward voting guide, based on where you live and how you plan to vote. Election season is always interesting graphics-wise, because all of the news outlets are starting with the same data and information. But they all show the data a little differently, asking various questions or using different visual approaches. Things are just getting started, but contrast this Post piece with FiveThirtyEight’s voting guide....

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Design your own election scenario

As we have seen, small shifts in voting behavior of various demographic groups can swing an election. The Washington Post provides an interactive that lets you shift these groups by both turnout and vote margin to see what might happen (based on a simplified model). Tags: election, Washington Post

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How long before there is gender equality in the U.S. House and Senate

For The Washington Post, Sergio Peçanha asks, “What will it take to achieve gender equality in American politics?“ It will take some more time and a lot more effort to reach equal representation. I asked my colleague David Byler, a statistics expert, to estimate how long it would take for women to reach equal numbers in Congress at the current pace. His estimate: about 60 years. Tags: gender equality, government,...

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Reduced mail sorting capacity

The United States Postal Service is losing mail sorting machines — as an election during a pandemic gets closer. The Washington Post reports on what they know so far, including the map above on reduced sorting capacity. Tags: election, sorting, USPS, Washington Post

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Visual explanation for how herd immunity works

Herd immunity works when you have enough people who are immune to a disease, maybe because they already got it or there’s a vaccine, so that the disease can’t spread anymore to those who don’t have a resistance. For The Washington Post, Harry Stevens is back with simulitis to demonstrate how this works in greater detail. It starts at the individual level, generalizes to a larger group, and then zooms...

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Electricity sources by state

With Joe Biden calling for 100% clean electricity, John Muyskens and Juliet Eilperin for The Washington Post looked at where states are at now in terms of electricity generation. The variable width bar chart above uses a column for each state. Clean electricity stacks on the top and fossil fuels stack on the bottom, each representing a percentage of total generation. Column width represents total electricity for each state. It...

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When the world shut down, seen through global flights

Lauren Tierney and William Neff for The Washington Post used a rotating globe to show how connections between countries quickly shut down as the coronavirus spread. I’m looking forward to when we get to watch the map in reverse. Tags: coronavirus, flights, Washington Post

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Map shows increasing confirmed cases in rural areas

This map by Tim Meko for The Washington Post uses time series lines to show change in confirmed cases by county. Using a combination of line thickness, height, and color, the map highlights the counties with the greatest change since early May. Hairy. Tags: coronavirus, Tim Meko, Washington Post

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How experts use disease modeling to help inform policymakers

Harry Stevens and John Muyskens for The Washington Post put you in the spot of an epidemiologist receiving inquiries from policymakers about what might happen: Imagine you are an epidemiologist, and one day the governor sends you an email about an emerging new disease that has just arrived in your state. To avoid the complexities of a real disease like covid-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus, we have...

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