Washington Post

155 posts
How quickly the U.S. is vaccinating vs. how long it’ll take to get back to “normal”

Vaccines provide light at the end of the tunnel, but when we finally get to the end depends on the speed at which we vaccinate. The Washington Post considers Joe Biden’s pledge for 100 million shots in his first 100 days in the context of herd immunity and calendar days. I appreciate the time spent explaining the intersection of these two lines. Tags: coronavirus, Joe Biden, vaccination, Washington Post

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How the mob broke into the U.S. Capitol

The Washington Post pieced together video footage from multiple sources for a timeline of the events. Terrible. Tags: Capitol, government, mob, Washington Post

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Infrared to show air particles from your talk hole

I’m sure you know this already, but just in case, air particles come out of your mouth when you talk, cough, etc. The Washington Post used an infrared camera to demonstrate: To visually illustrate the risk of airborne transmission in real time, The Washington Post used an infrared camera made by the company FLIR Systems that is capable of detecting exhaled breath. Numerous experts — epidemiologists, virologists and engineers —...

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Mapping 250,000 people

As we’ve talked about before, it can be hard to really understand the scale of big numbers. So when we hear that over 250,000 people died because of the coronavirus, it can be hard to conceptualize that number in our head. Lauren Tierney and Tim Meko for The Washington Post provide a point of comparison by highlighting counties that have have populations under 250,000. Whole counties, or whole clusters of...

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Votes that won the presidency

Voter turnout this election was higher than it’s been in a long time, but the winner margins were still small. Alyssa Fowers, Atthar Mirza and Armand Emamdjomeh for The Washington Post showed the margins with dots. Each circle represents 3,000 votes, and the blue and red circles represent by how much the candidate won by in a given state. The dots showing absolute counts are useful to see the scale...

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Student surveillance and online proctoring

To combat cheating during online exams, many schools have utilized services that try to detect unusual behavior through webcam video. As with most automated surveillance systems, there are some issues. For The Washington Post, Drew Harwell looks into the social implications of student surveillance: Fear of setting off the systems’ alarms has led students to contort themselves in unsettling ways. Students with dark skin have shined bright lights at their...

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Swings in the battleground states

For The Washington Post, Ashlyn Still and Ted Mellnik show the shifts in the 2020 election compared against the 2012 and 2016 elections. Good use of swooping arrows. Tags: election, swing, Washington Post

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Wind map to show change in vote shares and participation

The Washington Post goes with a wind metaphor to show the change in voting activity between 2016 and 2020. The up and down direction represents change in turnout, and the left and right direction represents change in vote margin. A fun riff on the classic Viégas and Wattenberg wind map and the Bostock and Carter election map from 2012. The Post map is based on this and this code. Tags:...

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Electoral coloring page

If you want to color in your own electoral map at home, The Washington Post provides this blank, printable page. I hear coloring is soothing or something like that. [via @SethBlanchard] Tags: coloring, election, Washington Post

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Fires in the west and climate change

This is some advanced mapping and scrollytelling from the Washington Post. The piece examines climate change in the context of the fires in the western United States. Starting in the beginning of August, the piece takes you through the timeline of events as your scroll. Maps of temperature, wind, lightning, and fire serve as the backdrop. Berry Creek, California, a mountain town that burned to the ground, provides an anchor...

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