words

1 posts
Different languages, but similar information rates

Christophe Coupé and company analyzed speech rate (on the left) across different languages, and then compared it to information rate (on the right) in bits per second. While speech rate and information rate are still coupled, there’s less variation in information rate across languages. More syllables doesn’t necessarily mean more information. Tags: information, language, words

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Find a color palette based on words

PhotoChrome is a straightforward tool that lets you use search terms to find a color palette. Just enter a query, and it spits out a color scheme of hex values based on matching images. It’s like Picular from a few years ago but more focused with a copy-paste. Tags: color, images, words

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✚ Uncertain Words and Uncertain Visualization, Better Together

People's interpretation of a chart can change if you use differents words to describe it, even if the data stays the same. Read More

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Words used to describe men and women’s bodies in literature

Authors tend to focus on different body parts for men and women, and the descriptions used for each body part also vary. For The Pudding, Erin Davis parsed a couple thousand books to see the scale of the skews. Tags: body, Erin Davis, gender, Liana Sposto, literature, Pudding, words

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Machine learning to make a dictionary of words that do not exist

Thomas Dimson trained a model to generate words that don’t exist in real life and definitions for said imaginary words. If you didn’t tell me the words were machine-generated, I’d believe a lot of them were actual parts of the English dictionary. Tags: machine learning, Thomas Dimson, words

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Wheel of emotional words

You’re probably feeling a range of emotions these days. It helps if you can express them. This emotional word wheel by Geoffrey Roberts might help: I work with people who have limited emotional vocabulary and as a result the intensity of their negative emotions and experiences is heightened because they can’t describe their feelings (especially their negative feelings). That’s why this list is heavily focused on negative emotions/ experiences. Being...

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Measuring the varied sentiments of good and bad words

There was a survey a while back that asked people to provide a 0 to 100 percent value to probabilistic words like “usually” and “likely”. YouGov did something similar for words describing good and bad sentiments. Tags: sentiment, words

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How people interpret probability through words

In the early 1990s, the CIA published internal survey results for how people within the organization interpreted probabilistic words such as “probable” and “little chance”. Participants were asked to attach a probability percentage to the words. Andrew Mauboussin and Michael J. Mauboussinran ran a public survey more recently to see how people interpret the words now. The main point, like in the CIA poll, was that words matter. Some words...

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History of the word ‘data’

Sandra Rendgen describes the history of “data” the word and where it stands in present day. All through the evolution of statistics through the 19th century, data was generated by humans, and the scientific methodology of measuring and recording data had been a constant topic of debate. This is not trivial, as the question of how data is generated also answers the question of whether and how it is capable...

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Data is, sometimes

Financial Times recently updated their style guide: data — the rule for always using data as plural has been relaxed. If you read data as singular then write it as such. For example, we already allow singular for ‘big data’. And we should for personal data too. An easy rule would be that if it can be used as a synonym for information then it should probably be singular —...

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