The neighborhood bank recently installed brand new ATMs, with tablet monitors and all that jazz. Then, I found myself staring at this screen:

Banknote_picker_us

I wanted to withdraw $100. I ordinarily love this banknote picker because I can get the $5, $10, $20 notes, instead of $50 and $100 that come out the slot when I don't specify my preference.

Something changed this time. I find myself wondering which row represents which note. For my non-U.S. readers, you may not know that all our notes are the same size and color. The screen resolution wasn't great and I had to squint really hard to see the numbers of those banknote images.

I suppose if I grew up here, I might be able to tell the note values from the figureheads. This is an example of a visualization that makes my life harder!

***
I imagine that the software developer might be a foreigner. I imagine the developer might live in Europe. In this case, the developer might have this image in his/her head:

Banknote_picker_euro

Euro banknotes are heavily differentiated - by color, by image, by height and by width. The numeric value also occupies a larger proportion of the area. This makes a lot of sense.

I like designs to be adaptable. Switching data from one country to another should not alter the design. Switching data at different time scales should not affect the design. This banknote picker UI is not adaptable across countries.

***

Once I figured out the note values, I learned another reason why I couldn't tell which row is which note. It's because one note is absent.

Banknote_us_2

Where is the $10 note? That and the twenty are probably the most frequently used. I am also surprised people want $1 notes from an ATM. But I assume the bank knows something I don't.

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