Laura pointed me to an infographic about tech worker salaries in major tech hubs (link).

What's wrong with this map?

Entrepreneur_techsalaries_map

The box "Global average" is doubly false. It is not global, and it is not the average!

The only non-American cities included in this survey are Toronto, Paris and London.

The only city with average salary above the "Global average" is San Francisco Bay Area. Since the Bay Area does not outweigh all other cities combined in the number of tech workers, it is impossible to get an average of $135,000.

***

Here is the second chart.

What's wrong with these lines?

Entrepreneur_techsalaries_lines

This chart frustrates the reader's expectations. The reader interprets it as a simple line chart, based on three strong hints:

  • time along the horizontal axis
  • data labels show dollar units
  • lines linking time

Each line seems to show the trend of average tech worker salary, in dollar units.

However, that isn't the designer's intention. Let's zoom in on Chicago and Denver:

Entrepreneur_techsalaries_lines2

The number $112,000 (Denver) sits below the number $107,000 (Chicago). It appears that each chart has its own scale. But that's not the case either.

For a small-multiples setup, we expect all charts should use the same scale. Even though the data labels are absolute dollar amounts, the vertical axis is on a relative scale (percent change). To make things even more complicated, the percent change is computed relative to the minimum of the three annual values, no matter which year it occurs.

Redo_entrepreneurtechsalarieslines2

That's why $106,000 (Chicago) is at the same level as $112,000 (Denver). Those are the minimum values in the respective time series. As shown above, these line charts are easier to understand if the axis is displayed in its true units of percent change.

The choice of using the minimum value as the reference level interferes with comparing one city to the next. For Chicago, the line chart tells us 2015 is about 2 percent above 2016 while 2017 is 6 percent above. For Denver, the line chart tells us that 2016 is about 2 percent above the 2015 and 2017 values. Now what's the message again?

Here I index all lines to the earliest year.

  Redo_junkcharts_entrepreneurtechsalaries_lines

In a Trifecta Checkup analysis (link), I'd be suspicious of the data. Did tech salaries in London really drop by 15-20 percent in the last three years?

 

 

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